Yemassee

Sheldon Church Ruins. A chapel of ease that was burnt by the British during the Revolutionary War, and then burnt again by the Union. My favorite place in South Carolina.

Sheldon Church Ruins. A chapel of ease that was burnt by the British during the Revolutionary War, and then burnt again by the Union. My favorite place in South Carolina.

When I was on the road to Sheldon early yesterday morning, I kind of knew what I was going to write about today. I was going to make a comparison to it’s Greek ancestors, and the Parthenon: describing what it felt like to draw a similar form in foreign and familiar circumstances.

I’ve spent a lot of time at Sheldon, some of which involved maintaining the ruins. Imagine mixing buckets of lime mortar and carrying them up to the top of the wall via ladder. It’s a lot taller than it looks…

I really do believe that your surroundings have a profound effect on your creative ability. When everything is new I find myself in a heightened state of awareness. There is no new car smell when you walk to the corner store.

And though I can’t get over the fact that writing about self-discovery seems like a heinous form of narcissism – what really struck me most about my time there was just that: Yesterday I learned a little bit about how I draw.

Alright y’all, watch this:

I arrived at 7:30 in morning. This what my first drawing looked like. Yeah... hell. It' looked like hell

I arrived at 7:30 in morning. This is what my first drawing looked like. Yeah… hell. It looked like hell.

... Drawing two and three...

… Drawing two and three…

Oh shit... drawing number four...

Oh shit… drawing number four…

Coming in hot!! Drawing number five.

Coming in hot!! Drawing number five.

Over reaching!! Drawing number six.

Melt-down-over-reaching!! Number six.

If I quantified sketches I would put up a graph to show the parabolic arc of creative work. Perhaps even comparing them based on location. I finally realized that knowing your process is essential for good work. I have been battling with inconsistency in my drawings. It causes me a great deal of frustration. I’m beginning to think that volume creates the opportunity for improvement.

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