Phase I

So, first things first: I’m sorry for the lapse in posts. With being away, and then picking up my life where I left it off, I got a bit distracted. But! I’m back…

And so, as I promised, an oldie but a goodie.

The Acropolis. When I hiked up to that glorious piece of rock, it became apparent to me that the temple that stood upon it was as old as time itself.

The Acropolis. When I hiked up to that glorious piece of rock, it became apparent to me that the temple that stood upon it was as old as time itself.

I had to go. Corbusier went and he didn’t even like classicism. If I’m doing my architectural education on my own, this is probably where I should have gone first, but so be it… Hopefully the architecture Gods will forgive me. My whole trip was very strange to say the least–but–I learned quite a bit. Now this may sound stupid, and I know that I knew that the Parthenon was built on top of a hill, but when I first got into Athens, stepped out into Monastiraki Square–nearly frozen by rain– and looked up, I was completely amazed to realize that I had never really seen the Parthenon in situ.

It’s on a hill. A really big hill.

Even my picture doesn’t really do it justice. But anyway, after hearing relentless criticisms about Athens for years, I walked out amidst architectural blight, graffiti, and dog excrement. At which time warmth slowly crept through my body. Inexplicably, I was completely taken by what I saw. It must have been the same feeling that Ruskin had when he walked about abandoned ruins of Gothic churches. In Athens, life is lived out in the streets. The Greek people are living through economic hardship, and the skirt has been lifted for everyone to see. You could stick your nose in it if you were brave. That being said, I still would take Athenian hell over or most other types of hell found in the US–These people still get to claim the most important building in the history of western architecture. And you know… lamb. And gyros. And carafes of wine.

The drawings I did while in Athens were done in two phases. Phase I: Quiet exertion where I tried to replicate my work in Istanbul. And Phase II: Were I realized that the whole “quiet exertion” thing wasn’t working, so I went to quick and dirty. These drawings are from Phase I.

A view of the Acropolis from a café nearby.

A view of the Acropolis from a café nearby.

Pediment of the Parthenon

Pediment of the Parthenon

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s